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Prevent Losing Audio Sync In Final Cut Pro

There have been plenty complaints in the DV discussion groups about audio that slowly moves out of sync as the playhead progresses down the timeline. For all of you Final Cut Pro users out there who are shooting your own footage, before you hit the record button, make sure that you are aware if you are recording audio at 12 or 16 bit. You'll have to go into the camera menu to determine this. Just in case you were wondering, 16 bit is where you want to be for the highest quality and dvd compliant audio. Now, after your camera has been set, its time to make Final Cut Pro aware of the specific sample rate by which you have recorded audio.

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The major cause for a timeline that slowly slips out of sync is the fact that the editor does not keep his sample rates consistant across the board while working in FCP. Capture settings as well as sequence settings should all be uniform. 48k will allow for the best audio. Save yourself some time and make sure that you and the people who are shooting for you are capturing audio at 16bit in-camera and that FCP is configured to handle 48k. Remember, anything other than 48k is not DVD compliant and if you set the audio playback quality to high under the user preferences, while playing back audio that is not 48k, the conversion alone could cripple a less than robust machine.

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Menu & Title Buttons in DVD Studio Pro was the previous entry in this blog.

Repeating Use of Images in Motion is the next entry in this blog.

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