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Compressor: December 2008 Archives

supercharging-compressor.pngYou can find more compression settings articles in our Supercharging Compressor series index.

Update:  Sorry, I seem to have erroneously published an empty draft of this article.  My apologies.  Here's the text ...

As you may be aware, the DVD standard uses a form of video compression called MPEG-2.  There are a few aspects of this codec that can impact the quality of your finished video -- and many of them stem from the fact that the codec works not in terms of frames, like the rest of your video process, but in terms of "Groups of Pictures," or GOPs.
supercharging-compressor.pngYou can find more compression settings articles in our Supercharging Compressor series index.

If you're using an Apple workflow, you're no doubt familiar with the ways in which Apple makes its Quicktime codec attractive for web and mobile delivery.  Exporting a .MOV "for the web" is as simple as, well, picking the "Web Streaming" preset in your application of choice.  Care to deliver to mobile devices?  Target iPhones and iPods with the presets of the same name.

This is an area where respectable people disagree -- and, if you do indeed disagree with me, I encourage you to voice your opinion in the comments.  But I strongly advocate avoiding Quicktime for web delivery.
supercharging-compressor.pngYou can find more compression settings articles in our Supercharging Compressor series index.

You can be plenty good at video work if you only know that bigger bitrates are usually better -- but if you're going to be a guru when it comes to the quality of your video output, it's worth taking a closer look at the concept from the ground up.

Luckily, it's a fairly simple concept.  Let's take NTSC video as our example: 30 frames per second, each 720 pixels wide and about 480 high.  Each broadcast-safe pixel, in RGB space, could take up 235 values for each color (red green and blue), so it needs 24 bits of information to describe it.  If we were to try to store a second of NTSC-type video completely uncompressed using this bitmap scheme, we would need

30 * 720 * 480 * 24 = 248,832,000 bits, or about 30MB -- per second!

Try slapping THAT on YouTube -- or a DVD, for that matter.
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This page is a archive of entries in the Compressor category from December 2008.

Compressor: November 2008 is the previous archive.

Compressor: January 2009 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.