Learn More Contact Now

Final Cut Pro 7: March 2008 Archives

Knowing when to use Soundtrack Pro vs when to bring a sound effect directly into Final Cut Pro is an aquired skill. In most cases if you are only bringing in one to three effects,. it is easier to just bring the sound effect right into Final Cut. An great way to accomplish this is to set your Spotlight to just search for music, preview the different options in Finder, and then drag the desired effect right into Final Cut. You can drag the effect directly form Finder into your Sequence, but if you may want to bring it into the File Browser first. Soundtrack Pro is great for assembling multi track audio, but if you only need one asset from Soundtrack Pro, you may want to consider this work flow.

sound_effects.gif



The Final Cu Pro Smooth Cam Filter is a very powerful tool, but to use it efficiently you need to follow a clip management procedure. When you analyize a clip you are actually analyzing the entire master clip. Since the analyization process can be rather time consuming, it is a good idea to export the portion of the master clip that you need to apply the smooth cam filter to, and then import the clip into your project. Now when you apply the smooth cam filter, you will only be applying it to the footage you intend to.

The process is to load the master clip into the viewer, set your in and out points, then export a Quicktime movie with the current settings, and you will have a clip that can be analyized much quicker.
Here is a cool trick to avoid having to re-render certain effects within Final Cut Pro. 

Each time you render an effect within Final Cut Pro a physical render file is created on one of your hard-drives.  Unless you've changed your render-files scratch disk, the default location would be:

Mac HD / Users / Username / Documents / Final Cut Pro Documents / Render Files / Name of Project 

render_file.gif
 










You can take the physical rendered file and re-import it back into your timeline or Browser window.  This is basically the same concept of exporting a flattened movie and re-importing back into Final Cut Pro.

render_file_in_timeline.gif







*One word of warning:

I recommend that you copy the render file to your capture scratch folder before importing it into your timeline or browser window to avoid media management issues.
Receive FREE Tutorials by email:

HANDS-ON COURSES in ORL

ONLINE VIDEO COURSES
    Avid Media Composer Training
  • Enrollment Cost: $50.00
  • 84 Media Composer Lectures
  • Includes Practice Media
  • Interactive Quizzes
  • Official Certificate of Completion
  • 30 Day Money Back Guarantee
  • Click to Enroll for 10% off!
    Final cut Pro X Training
  • Enrollment Cost: $20.00
  • 60 Final Cut Pro X Lectures
  • Includes Practice Media
  • Interactive Quizzes
  • Official Certificate of Completion
  • 30 Day Money Back Guarantee
  • Click to Enroll

about.this

This page is a archive of entries in the Final Cut Pro 7 category from March 2008.

Final Cut Pro 7: February 2008 is the previous archive.

Final Cut Pro 7: April 2008 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.