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Final Cut Pro Moving Filmstrip Effect

Within Final Cut Pro you can easily create basic composites that may save you time from having to use Apple Motion.  One great example is using Final Cut Pro to create a moving filmstrip effect.

Here is a quick tutorial on how to create a moving filmstrip using Final Cut Pro.
Keyframing in Final cut Pro is often a very intimidating skill to learn. The moving filmstrip you see going across the screen was created by keyframing the position of the clips from one side of the Canvas to the other. The first step to doing this effect is making sure all clips are all the same length. An under used Final Cut function for achieving this is the superimpose function, which will trim all clips superimposed to the length of the clip they are superimposed over. Now that we have 8 clips all the same length, we need to animate them. Lets work on the clip in track 8 so we can see what we are doing. After loading it into the Viewer we first will reduce the size, and then move the clip off to the the left so that the right edge of the clip is aligned with the left edge of the Canvas. Now that we have our starting position, we need to apply a position keyframe before we go any further. Now that keyframing has been turned on, any position change we make at any other frame will apply a keyframe automatically. Next we move our playhead to the last frame of the clip, and then move the clip across the Canvas, so the left edge of the clip is aligned with the right edge of the Canvas. As we play this clip we see that over it's 5 second duration, it moves from one position to another. To do this to all eight of these clips would get old after about the third one. So lets copy our clip, and just paste the Basic Motion attributes to the other clips. That was easy, now they are all moving at the exact same speed. the only problem is that they are all over top of one another, so we only see the top one. To stagger the clips we need to establish how long before the first one is on screen completely. We are at the one second and 9 frame mark, and our clip is completely on screen, that tells us that the clips needs to be one second and nine frames apart to have them fall into line behind one another. There are only ever four clips on screen at a time, so we can recycle tracks, so our sequence stays neat and tidy. There you go all eight clips following one another at the same pace. This is a great effect when you want to show a number of different clips, but don't have much time to do it. Creating the moving filmstrip effect in a separate sequence will allow you to control of it as a whole and have it play across the canvas on a slight angle for example. At GeniusDV our 5 day Final Cut Studio class is very progressive . sign up today to learn a great Final Cut Studio workflow.
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Optical Flow Stabilization in Motion was the previous entry in this blog.

VeeScope Live Chroma Keyer for Final Cut Pro is the next entry in this blog.

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