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fcp_icon.pngDid you know you can change the timing on your transitions in Final Cut Pro?  It's no secret, I love using transitions, within moderation of course; but I have a few favorites that I use and think to myself, wow, this would be even cooler if I could just slow it down a bit.  There are several ways to do this, mostly having to do with trimming the transition or changing the duration of the transition itself. 

One way is to simply right-click the transition and choose Duration from the drop down menu, and in the pop-up window that appears, enter the new duration and click OK.

transition_duration.pngAnother way is to just drag the edges of the transition icon to make it shorter or longer.  But the third way is what I personally use most:  using the Transition Editor.  Double-click on the transition to open it up in the Transition Editor.

transition_editor.pngYou can use the Transition Editor to make detailed changes to a transition's parameters.  Along with changing the timing, you can adjust the alignment, trim the edit point between 2 clips or even reverse the direction of a transition.

Check out this article for more detailed information about the Transition Editor.


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New Version of AutoMotion for Apple Motion was the previous entry in this blog.

Apple Color and the "Pleasantville Effect" is the next entry in this blog.

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