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One of the newest tricks of Final Cut Pro 7 that I've discovered this week is the Reveal Affiliated Clips in Front Sequence command.  What's that all about?  Well, this is a great little trick to use if you ever need to find out quickly how many times you've used a clip in a sequence, say for color correction for example.  Let's suppose there are 10 different places in your project that you've used the same clip, but it needs a bit of color correcting.  You don't want to accidentally forget to fix one of those clips; believe me, someone will notice; so what you can do to make this really simple is select your clip in the Timeline and from the View Menu, choose Reveal Affiliated Clips in Front Sequence.

reveal_affiliated_clips.gif

Now every affiliated clip will become selected in the Timeline.  Better yet, you can drop a color corrector filter on top of any of those affiliated clips, and the filter will be applied to all of them.  How simple is that!

clips_selected.gif

If you just need some tips on organizing your media, check out this article on Finding Used and Unused Clips in Final Cut Pro.  And don't forget to check our class schedule to learn just about everything you can about Final Cut Pro!


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Countdown Timer for Final Cut Pro was the previous entry in this blog.

Understanding RAM Previews in After Effects is the next entry in this blog.

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